Friday Five: Five Things I Look for in a Raiding Guild

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  1. You have set times to raid.
    Specifically, you raid at 6 p.m. pacific or a little bit after. This does not change based upon whimsy. Or enough people being on earlier. Or your raid leader not liking someone who can’t get online until 6 Pacific and thus trying to get things started before they log on.
  2. You confirm your raid slots in advance.
    No, not 30min in advance; a day or two in advance. Or better yet, you have a set raiding roster, and I’m on it. No one, including me, want to rush home form work to warm the bench.
  3. Your loot policies are clear, and not subject to change.
    Loot isn’t handed out based on their personal relationships with the raid leader/guild leader. RL/GL don’t get “dibs” on all the loot. Officers don’t get special consideration for special drops. There aren’t special requirements you’ve never heard about previously when a mount or a legendary drops.
  4. You have people on in your non-raid times.
    If your guild is a hot bed of activity during raid hours and a dead zone thereafter, that says to me there isn’t much camaraderie or community other than your raiding. And even if that’s very successful raiding, you’re not gong to be a good fit for me.
  5. Your guild leader/raid leader/officers are experienced and well respected.
    I am sure that there are many children under the age of 18 and people who’ve only been playing 6 months who are excellent guild and raid leaders. but so far, I haven’t encountered them. I’m a cranky 5 1/2 year veteran of WoW, and enjoy playing with people who are pretty experienced, mature, and with whom I have things in common in addition to playing this game.

What are the things you look for when shopping for a raiding guild?

 

4 thoughts on “Friday Five: Five Things I Look for in a Raiding Guild”

  1. All of the above plus a cohesive sense of humor. I love in-jokes (I don’t think my husband and I can hold a conversation without mentioning an inside joke between us).

  2. Yes! Raiding can’t be all serious business all the time. If they can’t laugh at themselves on occasion, they’re not going to be any fun to be around for sure.

  3. 2. Will not happen in any established raiding guild. Even if you run a tight roster with few people sitting out, having 25 confirmed bodies set aside for a raid a day in advance is a sure way to have only 22 or 23 people show up. It also allows no flex for raid comp changes or connection issues. It’s just part of making the group as a whole function.
    Now if your RL doesn’t handle bench rotation well, that’s a different issue. We frequently adjust who’s in for several farm bosses throughout the night depending on who needs what. Everyone but the RL and our MT sit out a bit now and then – but never for the entire night.

  4. I disagree, and think you misunderstood the spirit of #2. In my more serious raiding guilds I always knew if I was on deck to raid, or not, in advance. Only in the most casual guilds in which I’ve raided did I log on to see if I was raiding or not.
    Having pre-confirmed raid slots does not preclude the RL having a wait list or backups. It does tell your core raiders that they do, in fact, have a slot. I agree it is important to have some flexibility in your roster, but do not agree that means it is impossible to schedule your raiders– and backups– in advance.
    I personally think it is inconsiderate to keep people waiting until the last minute only to be sat. And think you need to award EP/DKP to those backups/wait listers who come online and don’t get to raid.

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